Golf lag is a term that is often thrown around in the world of golf, but do you really know what it means? In simple terms, lag in golf refers to the angle between the lead side forearm and the club as it travels down from the top of the swing. It plays a crucial role in the transition from backswing to downswing and greatly affects the power and effectiveness of your swing.

Contrary to popular belief, creating lag is not as simple as increasing wrist hinge on the way down. It involves the proper sequencing of movements in the downswing, body rotation, and maintaining the right wrist angles. By allowing the club head to fall behind the hands, you can maintain lag, leading to a proper impact position and improved shot accuracy.

If you’re looking to improve your golf swing and enhance your performance on the course, understanding and creating lag is essential. In this comprehensive guide, we will delve deeper into the concept of lag in golf, debunk common myths, review how the wrists move during the swing, and provide tips for a better transition in the downswing and maintaining lag.

Key Takeaways:

  • Lag in golf refers to the angle between the lead side forearm and the club during the downswing.
  • Creating lag involves proper sequencing, body rotation, and maintaining the right wrist angles.
  • Increasing wrist hinge is not the key to creating lag in the golf swing.
  • Understanding how the wrists move during the swing is crucial to achieving lag.
  • Improving the transition in the downswing and maintaining lag can be achieved through sequencing, body rotation, and proper wrist angles.

The Common Myth that Exists about Lag in Golf

When it comes to lag in golf, there is a common misconception among amateur golfers that needs to be debunked. Many believe that increasing the wrist hinge on the way down from the top is the key to creating lag in the golf swing. However, this is far from the truth. Lag in golf is not about simply increasing the wrist hinge, but rather about allowing the club head to fall behind the hands in the downswing.

The proper sequencing on the downswing is what leads to the desired lag angle between the club shaft and the lead forearm. It is important to understand that lag is not solely dependent on the wrists. Instead, it is achieved through a combination of proper body rotation, sequencing, and maintaining the correct wrist angles.

The misconception surrounding lag in golf can hinder golfers from achieving their full potential in terms of power and accuracy. By dispelling this myth and focusing on the correct techniques, golfers can better understand and create lag in their golf swings, leading to improved performance on the course – and remember we want lag not casting the club.

An Important Review of How the Wrists Move in the Golf Swing

To understand the concept of lag in the golf swing, it is crucial to have a clear understanding of how the wrists move during the swing. The movement of the wrists plays a significant role in creating and maintaining lag, which ultimately leads to a more powerful and effective swing. Let’s take a closer look at the different movements of the wrists and their impact on the golf swing.

Wrist Extension and Flexion

During the golf swing, the wrists go through two primary movements: extension and flexion. Wrist extension occurs when the back of the hand moves towards the top of the forearm, while wrist flexion happens when the palm moves towards the underside of the forearm. These movements allow for a dynamic and controlled release of the club, generating speed and power in the downswing.

Wrist Radial and Ulnar Deviation

In addition to extension and flexion, the wrists also move in a radial and ulnar deviation. Wrist radial deviation is the side-to-side movement of the wrist towards the radius bone, while wrist ulnar deviation is the movement towards the ulna bone. These movements contribute to the correct positioning of the club throughout the swing, ensuring proper impact and maximizing lag.

By modulating the tension in the wrists and allowing them to sag slightly, golfers can create and maintain lag in their swing. This slight sagging of the wrists, combined with the proper sequencing and body rotation, enables the clubhead to fall behind the hands, resulting in a powerful release and accurate shot.

The Importance of Proper Techniques

Creating and maintaining lag in the golf swing requires a combination of proper techniques and practice. Golfers should focus on maintaining the right wrist angles and sequencing their movements correctly. It is also crucial to emphasize body rotation and the initiation of the downswing with the hips, transferring the momentum from the upper body to the lower body.

By understanding the different movements of the wrists during the golf swing and implementing the proper techniques, golfers can improve their ability to create and maintain lag. Practicing drills that target wrist angles, sequencing, and body rotation can further enhance the golfer’s performance on the course, resulting in more powerful and accurate shots.

Tips for a Better Transition in the Downswing and Maintaining Lag

When it comes to achieving a better transition in the downswing and maintaining lag in your golf swing, there are a few key tips that can help you improve your technique. First and foremost, focus on your sequencing and body rotation. By shifting the momentum from your upper body and shoulders to the lower part of your body, you’ll be able to generate more power and have a more effective downswing. This will help you maintain lag and achieve a more powerful impact.

Another important aspect to consider is the role of your wrists. As you transition from the backswing to the downswing, it’s crucial to modulate the tension in your wrists and allow them to sag slightly. This will help you maintain the proper lag angle between the club shaft and your lead forearm. Additionally, focusing on your wrist angles at impact can make a significant difference in maintaining lag. Flattening or adding flexion in your lead wrist at impact can help you achieve the desired lag and maximize power.

To practice these techniques and improve your transition and lag, consider incorporating specific drills into your training routine. For example, you can work on sequencing drills that emphasize the proper shift of momentum and body rotation. You can also focus on wrist angle drills that help you develop a better feel for maintaining the correct angles during the downswing. By consistently practicing these drills, you’ll be able to improve your transition and maintain lag in your golf swing.

TipDescription
Focus on Sequencing and Body RotationShift the momentum from your upper body to the lower part of your body to generate more power in the downswing.
Modulate Wrist TensionAllow your wrists to sag slightly during the transition to maintain the desired lag angle.
Work on Wrist Angles at ImpactFlatten or add flexion in your lead wrist at impact to achieve the proper lag position.
Practice Sequencing and Wrist Angle DrillsIncorporate specific drills into your training routine to improve your transition and maintain lag.

By implementing these tips and practicing the necessary drills, you’ll be on your way to achieving a better transition in the downswing and maintaining lag in your golf swing. Remember to focus on your sequencing, body rotation, and wrist angles, and be consistent with your practice. With time and dedication, you’ll see improvements in your swing and overall performance on the course.

In Summary

Lag in the golf swing is a critical factor in achieving power and accuracy. This refers to the angle between the lead forearm and the club as it descends from the top of the swing. Contrary to popular belief, creating lag is not solely about increasing wrist hinge on the downswing. It requires proper sequencing, body rotation, and maintaining the correct wrist angles.

To create lag in the golf swing, it is important to focus on the overall sequencing and body rotation. This involves shifting the momentum from the upper body to the lower body during the downswing. Additionally, initiating body rotation with the hips generates power and helps maintain lag.

Understanding and developing lag in the golf swing takes practice and awareness of the proper techniques. By honing your sequencing, body rotation, and wrist angles, you can enhance your transition and maximize lag for more powerful and accurate shots on the course.